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25 September 2021
Map Your Business Goals to Your Website

Identifying your business goals and mapping them to your website is a critical step to figure out which of your advertising and marketing activities are turning into revenue for your business.

In this post, I’ll discuss how to map your business goals to your website before configuring conversion tracking in Google Analytics to represent your business goals.

First, let’s define what “conversions” are.


Contents

  1. What are conversions
    1. Offline vs online conversions
  2. Who maps your business goals to your website
  3. When do you map your business goals to your website
  4. Where do you map your business goals
  5. Why map your business goals on your website
  6. How to map your business goals to your website

What are conversions

The term “conversion” is broad and can take on many different meanings. Here’s the simplest way I could define a conversion:

A desired action you want your website visitor to take on your website.

In essence, it’s the goal or goals you want your website visitor to take action on. You can segment them into two broad categories: offline or online.

Offline vs online conversions

There are two general types of conversions in terms of where your desired action occurs: offline or online.

An offline conversion occurs outside of your website (ex: phone call, physically signed contract).

On the other hand, an online conversion happens in your website (ex: purchase order, form submission).

Who maps your business goals to your website

Creating a plan to represent your business goals on your website is coordinated with two parties: a business stakeholder (ex: business owner, manager) and a technical person to carry out your conversion tracking on your website.

When do you map your business goals to your website

After you setup your baseline Google Analytics website tracking, you’ll want to define which goals to configure on your website.

Google Analytics collects hundreds of data points from your website visitors, however, it cannot determine what your business goals are.

This requires a custom setup to track your key performance indicators (KPI’s), another name for the metrics that generate revenue for your business.

Where do you map your business goals

Mapping your business goals can be outlined on a notepad. The important part is to identify all the conversion actions where a sale is generated or where an action leads to a sale.

After all the conversion actions are identified by a business stakeholder on the client side, the next step is to ensure the conversion actions are clearly displayed on the website.

From here, you will be able to start your configuration of conversion tracking.

Why map your business goals on your website

The cornerstone of any successful online advertising or marketing is to have sound tracking and analytics.

If you can’t measure, you can’t improve.

The beginning of this process is to understand what the business goals are for you or your client and only then begin to figure a plan of action to use your website as a medium to reach your end (increase revenue).

Without mapping your business goals on your website, you won’t reach your website’s potential to generate revenue.

How to map your business goals to your website

You can think of your website as a 24/7 sales person going to work for you.

This mapping exercise is effectively reverse engineering your sales process and replicating on your website.

The key parts are to list all of the conversion actions and clearly represent them on your website.

Here’s a simple framework on how to get started.

  1. Identify where the sale takes place (offline or online).
  2. If offline, what are the actions that lead to a sale? List all of the conversion actions (ex: phone call, form submission).
  3. If online, you’ll want to first track the transactions that occur on your website. Then track other “secondary” conversions that lead to a sale (ex: form submissions, special offer signups).
  4. Clearly display all conversion actions on your website. This is the most complex step because it can involve multiple roles to execute effectively (ex: web developer, designer, copy writer, user experience) and represent your conversion actions. For example, designing and building a checkout flow for your product involves a multidisciplinary team to pull off.
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